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Blog Posts by: Aaron Sáenz

A day in port and we wake up in Holland, surrounded by windmills and four meters below sea level, but this time are no bizarre and unpredictable love story, only the tide. Everyone returned to their nest, burrow, shelter or bunk after a nighttime foray into the streets of Groningen, and no one deserted.

We’re moored in Eemshaven port in the Netherlands and we’re now past the halfway point in the expedition.

Throughout this time, we’ve been quite a few days without having seen land, right in the centre of the North Sea and SCUBA diving in some amazing places such as the Norwegian coast and in Scottish waters. Even though we have been enjoying being out at sea, it’s always nice to harbour and have some time off.

I've started my adventures out here in the North Sea, which was unknown territory for me until today.

Jorge (our GIS analyst) and I travelled on Monday to Eemshaven port to join the expedition for the Danish leg. For two weeks we’ll be carrying out research in several areas of interest in Dutch waters, looking for essential habitats for fish species as well as for the marine ecosystem in general.

It’s Monday evening when we arrived at Eemshaven harbour. A huge sticker “Oceana” on Icelands vessel Neptune welcomed us, along with a dozen smiling nationalities (mainly Spanish) in Oceana shirts.

Today we work up in port and although we had some new Dutch colleagues coming on board the Neptune, we didn’t get the chance to meet them before we had to leave the vessel. A few of us had to come off for a few days to make room for the Dutch divers and PhD students. It’s sad to leave our workmates behind for a few days but also exciting to get to know Groningen a little better and take away with us a bit of Dutch culture.

Ever since we left Hirtshals port in Denmark, we’ve been sailing in Danish and German waters, doing some dives with the underwater robot (ROV) and scuba diving in search of bubbling reefs.

On Saturday we came into Eemshaven, a Dutch port. And here there is such a striking contrast between the huge wind farms next to two big power stations, with the clouds of coal smoke billowing out of them.

At night we went out to party with the most of the crew on board as tomorrow is a day off. Regarding, the campaign itself, I’m really enjoying the work that we’re doing.

Well, today, it’s 29th July and we’re still on Neptune. The days go by and now the good atmosphere on board has turned into friendships.

We now know each other a lot, we all have a laugh together and we help each other out. But the most important thing is we work perfectly as a team.

Some days it can be hard being here but then there’s always someone who will make you laugh and that makes your day.

Three-bladed titans greeted us as the day broke. The huge air generators on the horizon provide electricity to a civilization that has started to feel very far from us after nine days at sea which, after treating us well for the last month or so, has started to show its true colours./p>

Today started out not so good, with strong winds and quite a lot of waves. So it was not possible to deploy the ROV in the morning so we did some grabs and CTD here and there. Later in the day there was less wind so we tried to do a ROV and that gave some good results. But OK, enough about ROVs, grabs and CTDs. I’d like to talk about another subject what is aswell important on board. And that is comunication with home on board a ship. When I started sailing, about 30 years ago now, there was no internet, no mobile phones, no wifi, no satelitte communication.

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